Doing, Not Reading, Leads to Change

Each summer a new list of “must read” books crops up.

And, I must admit, I go through them checking to see what’s been added to the list. What should I add to my “Reading List” that continues to grow at a rate only slightly slower than my 16-year-old son.

About a year ago, I noticed that despite all the reading I was doing and had done, many things were pretty much unchanged. Sure, there were slight differences. I felt smarter and more capable, especially during Twitter chats and evening parties where I could offer a book suggestion for many topics.

But, still not the significant change I had expected. I mean, wasn’t something supposed to change? Isn’t that what the whole 5 hour rule is all about? What was I missing?

It was another great “AHA” moment! These people read in order to DO!

Doing Leads to Change!

See, in order for change to happen, you have to do.

Instead of consuming more, I had to create more.

Instead of planning more, I had to execute more.

Routines aren’t any good if all you do is write them out.

You need to set the alarm for5 AM and then get out of bed!

You need to develop a fitness plan and then execute it.

You need to organize an eating routine and then follow it.

In order to write better, well, you have to write.

I mean, really, look at what it did for my reading!

Doing to be Creative

So for the last year, I’ve been doing more, consuming less. I write more blog posts and journal more.

I develop routines that I don’t need to write down every day – they’re routines!

I was spending so much time looking for that “perfect” way to track time and workout and … I was spending more time consuming and not near enough time on doing.

George Couros, in The Innovators Mindset: Empower Learning, Unleash Talent, and Lead a Culture of Creativity, says

What you can do is create the conditions where change is more likely to happen.

To create these conditions, one has to do something. It is in the act of doing that something is created. But to do this, you have to begin to find your own voice.

Todd Henry, the author of Louder Than Words: Harness the Power of Your Authentic Voice, says

When you are pouring yourself into your work and bringing your unique perspective and skills to the table, then you are adding value that only you are capable of contributing.

As a teacher, this is so important. It is the act of creating, of bringing your unique voice to the classroom, that great things will happen. It may take time for you to find that voice, but until you spend more time creating and less time consuming, the voice will be lost, covered over by layers of other voices, one’s you’ve read.

What are your consumption habits? Do they keep you from being creative and doing more?

Are you spending time learning about being more creative or are you doing more to be more creative?

Are you always looking and reading about ways to find “balance” or are you making decisions and doing things to thrive?

I’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas about this topic. Leave me a comment or send me a note on Twitter at @kwhobbes.

Until next Wednesday, seek what is vital, focus on the important; find your own creative voice.